[PDF] The Virgin Suicides By Jeffrey Eugenides – Horsebackridingwisconsin.us

The Virgin Suicides Num Bairro Residencial De Grosse Pointe Michigan , Cinco Irm S Adolescentes Suicidam Se No Espa O De Um Ano Cec Lia, A Mais Nova, A Primeira As Outras Imit La O Depois Estes Suic Dios Marcam Para Sempre Os Jovens Rapazes Da Vizinhan A Que Viveram E Sofreram Com Elas Dist Ncia Vinte Anos Mais Tarde Eles Tentam Reconstituir Os Acontecimentos, Presos Ainda Na Fascina O E Obsess O Que As Misteriosas Irm S Lhe Provocaram Therese A Intelectual, Mary A Coquete, Bonnie A Asceta, Lux A Libertina E A P Lida E M Stica Cecilia.

10 thoughts on “The Virgin Suicides

  1. says:

    suicide isn t the happiest of topics the suicides of five sisters is even less pleasant how do you recommend a book to someone on such a grim topic easy just read it what eugenides does so well is capture the mystery of secluded sisters, as seen through the eyes of neighborhood boys this is important in reading the novel it s not necessarily the lisbon sisters story, but rather the boys story, and how the suicides affected them all the way into adulthood the boys are now men and they retell their story they ve never fully recovered from the events of that year, as evidenced by the carefully catalogued and numbered evidence they ve collected over the years faded photographs, scraps of paper, newspaper clippings, etc it s as though their growth and development from boys to men has been permanently stunted, and it s something of a tragedy to read euginedes use of a vague narrator allows the reader to actively participate in the mystery and confusion as the boys try to come to terms with the deaths the ...

  2. says:

    I simply didn t get this book I was so desperate to find hidden meaning in it, but there was nothing Why waste so much paper and ink on something so overtly pretentious and so utterly meaningless A group of oppressed sisters kill themselves after flirting with the neighborhood boys How horrible that it happened in the middle of suburban America, where white picket fences are supposed to render such neighborhoods impermeable to tragic teenage death In the end, all I got from this book was the fact that the girls were peculiar and hello at least one was not a virgin when she committed suicide , the boys were immature, the girls parents were psychotic Okay, sure, I get that there may have been metaphors and themes about the hypocrisy of middle America, oppressive religion, etc etc., but I wasn t impressed I saw Sofia Coppola s film afterward no, it did not improve my understanding or appreciation of the film.I had read Middlesex by Eugeni...

  3. says:

    I had to take some time after reading this and do some deep thinking before I could review It is such an unusual story good, but dark and full of nooks and crannies for skeletons and other vermin to hide It is hard to say I enjoyed a story like this that would be like saying I enjoyed a car wreck intriguing, but lots of people and property were damaged in the process.One main thing I can say is I don t think I have seen the main story take as much of a back seat to the setting, the symbolism, and the side characters The book is The Virgin Suicides , but they might be the least important, as well as the most important, part of the book Are you confused yet Setting The neighborhood, the houses, the tree house, the school Description of buildings The importance of a location Certain windows serving as stages into the performance of people s lives All very complex and interesting.Coated in muck Throughout the book things are covered in dust, slime, dead bugs, etc Everything is made to seem like it is coated, and a deeper truth is underneath And, I think it is important that the coating is never pretty Things aren t coated in sugar, or clouds, or pretty makeup It is always foul, stinking, decaying, etc.Symbolism As the story deteriorates, so do the structures and the people Buildings decay People become and unstable Every element spirals into a gloomy miasma and it moves towards the ultimate sad climax.The boys the boys in the story serving as narrators really kept maki...

  4. says:

    This book is like a preface, where the real book never feels like it begins Endless foreshadowing mixed in with various teenage boy obsessions about what a home with five daughters must entailboxes and boxes of tampons, etc I cou...

  5. says:

    Once, when I was 13, my father came home early from work and asked to see my yearbook It was the last day of junior high, and I remember that I leaned against the kitchen counter, cracking my knuckles, and watched as he slowly turned the glossy pages, reading all of the comments that had been written by my friends He was silent the entire time he was reading, but when he finished, he handed me back my yearbook and said, I loved being a teenager, but I wouldn t be one now for anything in the world I thought I was going to receive a lecture that evening, but I didn t To this day, I have wondered what spurred on his sudden interest in my social life and my friends Had he read an article about the rise of teen suicide My father had been a teenager in the late 1950s his kids became teenagers in the 1980s I can only imagine it was a very different experience for him.He was born 20 years before the author of this book, Jeffrey Eugenides, but they both grew up in the U.S., in the Midwest, and both of them experienced childhoods that were heavily influenced by the auto industry.They also both watched a lot of changes occur in the U.S., not the least of these being the confusing shifts in the lives of American adolescents.And I wish, wish, WISH that my father had disc...

  6. says:

    So disappointed with this book.Couldnt get my head round the characters

  7. says:

    Where to begin I have read some of the reviews of others who did not care for or get this book I admit that the plot storyline, though unique, is not what makes this story great it s the prose The writing is luminous and reads like poetry than a novel We don t even know exactly who the narrators are it is narrated in first person plural and the name and even number of narrators is left vague Eugenides uses metaphor to describe the deaths of the sisters as the disintegration of a suburban neighborhood the trees are being cut down because of the threat of Dutch Elm disease there are dying flies everywhere that are described by the first sister to commit suicide as not even having time to eat before their lives are over There are so many themes in the story going through the layers is akin to peeling an onion The writing is so lovely that it induces a dreamlike state in the reader Everything is described so perfectly that you can not only see clearly what is being described, but smell the various smells and recall with clarity everything from that time period Eugenides did not throw this book together in my mind s eye I see him sitting at his desk turning each phrase over and over in his hands until he gets it exactly right Yet, the writing is not strained at all in fact, it seems to have flowed effortlessly from his pen This is a gifted writer whose work will be read for generations to come, long after Eat, Pray, Gag is in the remainder pile ...

  8. says:

    5 5Ten a ganas de dejar un poco de lado la literatura juvenil, as que decid coger esta novela que llevaba un tiempo llam ndome desde mis estanter as Qu sorpresa que se haya convertido en uno de los mejores libros que he le do, pero pocos tienen la magia de la que bien puede alardear esta novela Si tuviera que describir Las v rgenes suicidas con una palabra, sa ser a sin duda intensa No s si fue cosa de la narraci n, o la necesidad de conocer qu desencaden la secuencia de suicidios de las hermanas Lisbon, y que adem s, a pesar de conocer el desenlace de antemano, lograra mantenerme en vilo en todo momento Viviendo las vidas de este grupo de hermanas a trav s de diferentes pares de ojos, que terminan formando un caleidoscopio de las mismas Un caleidoscopio adem s, gracias al cual acab pensando que Bonnie, Therese, Mary, Lux y Cecilia eran reales, que las conoc a de verdad y al mismo tiempo apenas sab a nada de ellas en absoluto Como si s lo se narrara lo equivalente a la punta del iceberg, con un fondo tan profundo que se requerir an p ginas y p ginas para conocerlas realmente Y es que as somos todos en realidad, no Me ha parecido desgarradora la forma de tratar el tema del control y la opresi n familiares De c mo los padres de estas j venes, que con toda la buena intenci n quieren llevarlas por el ...

  9. says:

    For me, what makes this novel different from those that I ve read so far is the narrator s voice first person plural and the brilliant way Jeffrey Eugenides born 1960 made use of it Since the story is about 5 teenage sisters and the narrators were interested on them, readers presumed that they were narrating from the viewpoint of schoolboys with raging hormones and think of sex almost every hour of the day Until the last sentence when Eugenides revealed that the narrators are already middle age men with thinning hair and soft bellies My perception of the story as a reader made a complete turnaround Being a middle age man myself and having a teenager daughter, the last page upped the story s impact on me.The collective voice of the narrators who are voyeurs of the Lisbon family oozes with innocence of being young and sexually curious and guilt of being voyeurs who did not do anything to save the sisters If you read this novel in a superficial manner, this is just about 5 young sisters 13 year old Cecilia, 14 year old Lux, 15 year old Bonnie, 16 year old Mary, and 17 year old Therese who killed themselves because of their very strict mother and workaholic submissive effeminate father They probably lost all hopes of having a good future like finishing school after t...

  10. says:

    Honestly, I really wanted to fall in love with this I ve long been aware of its status as a cult classic and many people I know, as well as people I don t know but whose taste seems to correspond closely with mine, have professed to adore it So I feel a bit uncomfortable about revealing that I disliked it I ll admit, I have been guilty of judging people a bit if I see they ve slated a book I really love, and this seems to be a book that has a lot of meaning for many readers but, there you go, I can t help it.I DO get a lot of the things people love about the story the hazy, filmic quality of the writing, the sense of indefinable loss and nostalgia for childhood, the effective use of first person plural narrative, the clever structure with the obsessive boys cataloguing every shred of information they can find about the Lisbon girls and collating it into a sort of testament But I didn t get much enjoyment from reading it The tone reminded me a lot A LOT of The Lovely Bones, which I also disliked, and I presume this book must have been a major infuence on Alice Sebold s style Some of the descriptive language seemed identical ly ridiculous , for example the inventory of items thrown out from the Lisbons house including blankets sopped with the picnic of the girls spilled sleep what I felt repulsed by a lot of it the descriptions, the characters and the general queasy atmosphere mad...

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