☆ Νόμοι PDF / Epub ✩ Author Plato – Horsebackridingwisconsin.us

Νόμοι The Laws, Plato S Longest Dialogue, Has For Centuries Been Recognized As The Most Comprehensive Exposition Of The Practical Consequences Of His Philosophy, A Necessary Corrective To The Visionary And Utopian Republic In This Animated Encounter Between A Foreign Philosopher And A Powerful Statesman, Not Only Do We See Reflected, In Plato S Own Thought, Eternal Questions Of The Relation Between Political Theory And Practice, But We Also Witness The Working Out Of A Detailed Plan For A New Political Order That Embodies The Results Of Plato S Mature Reflection On The Family, The Status Of Women, Property Rights, Criminal Law, And The Role Of Religion And The Fine Arts In A Healthy Republic.

10 thoughts on “Νόμοι

  1. says:

    And then, as time went on, the poets themselves introduced the reign of vulgar and lawless innovation They were men of genius, but they had no perception of what is just and lawful in music raging like Bacchanals and possessed with inordinate delights mingling lamentations with hymns, and paeans with dithyrambs imitating the sounds of the flute on the lyre, and making one general confusion ignorantly affirming that music has no truth, and, whether good or bad, can only be judged of rightly by the pleasure of the hearer And by composing such licentious works, and adding to them words as licentious, they have inspired the multitude with lawlessness and boldness, and made them fancy that they can judge for themselves about melody and song And in this way the theatres from being mute have become vocal, as though they had understanding of good and bad in music and poetry and instead of an aristocracy, an evil sort of theatrocracy has grown up For if the democracy which judged had only consisted of educated persons, no fatal harm would have been done but in music there first arose the universal conceit of omniscience and general law...

  2. says:

    Despite having been assigned it in my Classical Political Thought class, I only in the past few days finished reading Plato s Laws apologies to Dr Walsh Which is a bit unfortunate, since it s bloody fantastic.I confess to having had a bit of a meh relationship with Plato in the past I mean, the number of his dialogues that I ve actually enjoyed as opposed to just kind of thinking they re okay is pretty small basically the Ion and maybe bits of Epistle VII Sure, I ve read and discussed what are usually counted as his greatest works Gorgias, Meno, Apology, and of course The Republic and even taught them in class I prefer teaching the Crito, since it s short and a quick read for the students But this was the first book where Plato and I really clicked It was the first one of his that I ve read where I found myself wanting to read , to find out where the argument was going, and to see what the next step in his argument would be Part of the reason for this may have been a translation issue I read the Penguin Classics translation of The Laws done by Trevor Saunders an excellently done work with good footnotes and introductory summaries , and part of it may have been the fact that all the other times I ve read Plato it was for class I can ...

  3. says:

    The one Plato work that makes for accessible, organised, readingI have the greatest respect for Plato s work and what it has meant for Western thought and Western culture To my chagrin, Plato and the Socratic dialogues have proven hard to go through, if you are like me the sort who sees an argument that looks strange picks it apart, because believes character is flippant works on refuting it for 5 minutes realises author is dead and can t answer does a Tasmanian Devil impersonationHowever, here we are dealing with ...

  4. says:

    This mammoth work is one of Plato s most important, and not very widely read books There s good reason for this, while there are important passages in this, the work is ultimately like reading an Ancient Greek version of Leviticus In other words, it s really really boring.

  5. says:

    There is a popular saying in the film world, that directors spend their whole careers making the same film over and over again Plato spent his whole career working out the ideas laid out in Laws Some of it is in the Republic, most of it can be found in other dialogues Stray ...

  6. says:

    Particularly interesting to anyone interested in legislation and ethics Very unlike other works from Plato, with little focus on metaphysics.

  7. says:

    The Laws of Plato is not entirely laws It is not entirely anything, really It seems to be a nice collection of aphoristic sayings, wise and pithy truths, and overall a collection of legal requirements for a city whose regulation is the main focus of this work Designing a city can be difficult, and whereas The Republic was largely metaphorical and none too practical, pragmatism is the design for this book In addition to designing laws, Plato goes step by step and designs the arguments one should have to devise said laws, and even to devise said arguments to devise said laws this may seem recursive on first glance, but in some cases the justification was indeed the punishment, as in the justification for the law itself would most likely have been the appropriate logical foundation of the purification rites, in addition to incarceration It is dry It is bland But so was the Old Testament, and at times, this can seem very reminiscent of that old law based text as well With very key differences and very key similarities one major key difference was the lack of enforcement of principal on loans Another key difference was the allowance for anger for expiation of crimes If committed in anger, it is curious to note, this hypothetical Cretan utopia would NEVER punish with death, unless a matricide or patricide The Judaic law of course, would have had this individual pay for his crimes through the avenger in blood Talion Likewise, th...

  8. says:

    The 3 star rating is an average of the ratings I would have given each of the twelve Books of the Laws if they were read separately Some flaws in the text The Athenian Stranger leaves open very important facets of legislation, while thoroughly legislating much less pertinent ones Heavy burden placed on assumptions of many kinds to do with human nature Inherent counter productive legislation ie legislation with a view to friendship, but allowing nay, promoting citizens to denounce one another However, I think these flaws are needed, as they represent the great difficulty in embarking on man s greatest journey creating an entirely new political order Plato s Laws is an e...

  9. says:

    I ll open myself up for criticism and confess that I did not actually finish Plato s Laws I made it all the way through Book VIII, then I started skimming, and when that proved just as boring, I went and looked at the secondary literature about the work There s a great summary at Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy in an entry titled Plato on Utopia, available HERE.Plato s Laws is a work written by Plato in his later years, when he s an old man Interestingly, Plato had been, prior to writing The Laws, an advisor to a tyrant in Sicily whose rule Plato was supposed to guide Instead, Plato landed in prison Before the problem with the tyrant, Plato had written in his younger days The Republic, where he had imagined a just society to be the mirror of the just soul, where wise kings rule spirited soldiers and pleasure seeking working classes just as people justly control their souls by having their wisdom control their motivations and desires.There is nothing in The Laws approximating this tripartite division of the soul or of the just society like that in The Republic Nor is there a robust sense of the ideas commonly associated with Plato, like his view that knowledge is a soul s recollection of what was already imprinted on it before the time of birth, although some views, like his v...

  10. says:

    When starting a new nation, the founding laws are key to that nation s long term survival Written well, and your nation will flourish Written poorly and your nation will not last for long In that spirit, when given the theoretical chance to found a new city state in Ancient Greece, Plato attacks the issue with relish in this dialogue that may also have been one of his last written works In some ways, it is a sequel to The Republic, but, unlike that classic book of philosophy, this one is not very interesting Indeed, this book was mostly tedious There were a few interesting sections, like his section...

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